Irohazaka in the Vall de Gallinera

Autumn is my favourite season, and has been ever since my very first encounter with the brilliant autumn colours of deciduous trees in Nikko, Japan over four decades ago. Since then I’ve always looked forward to this yearly spectacle wherever I lived — the US, Canada, UK, and Germany.

Now that I live in southern Valencia, I’ve come to accept that this is one natural phenomenon that I’ve foregone. Although the gingkos and poplars do turn an eye-catching yellow, it’s autumn’s fiery reds and oranges that delight my eyes. To experience such blazing colours, I assumed one would have to travel to Spain’s colder regions, to Asturias and Galicia perhaps, or Cantabria, Navarra, and the Basque country, and even as far afield as northern France.

All the more astonishing then to come across such a spectacular show, just a short drive away — minutes really — down to the Vall de Gallinera in Alicante. I’ve now baptized this area Irohazaka, after the renowned attraction of coloured foliage blanketing the mountain slopes in Nikko during autumn. And, were this Nikko, the whole valley would be packed with tourist buses inching their way all along these winding mountain roads. We were there on a Sunday, and no one else regarded the metamorphosis of leaves from green to red and orange and purple as anything worth marvelling at, or even meriting a second glance. All the other cars sped by. How fortuitous for us then to have these gorgeously coloured fields and slopes to ourselves 🙂

The Vall de Gallinera is famous for its black cherries in May — reputed to be the earliest to ripen in the region. And the best tasting as well — they are juicy and luscious with a nice balance of sweetness and tartness, with a dense, chewy texture. In spring, the entire valley is a joy to drive and walk through, with the cherries and almonds, peaches and apples clothed in white and pink blossom. I should have known, from my own experience with our cherry tree in the UK, that these trees would be equally spectacular in their autumn garb. For this momentary lapse of forgetfulness over how cherry trees behave in autumn, I can perhaps be forgiven, as our own cherry tree and those of our neighbours in our mountain hamlet, have not displayed flaming colours before falling.

Gallinera downslope cherry terraces fab_7667 copy.jpg

Gallinera mt stonewall cherry orchard vvfab wow_7685.JPG

Gallinera cherry orchard lvs on grnd vvfab_7681

Gallinera two cherry lvs Benisilli autumn fab_7698

And after our eyes had feasted on foliage, it was time for another kind of feast — steaks grilled over the embers of a woodfire at the restaurant La Font in Benitaia. The tarta de queso (cheese cake) was topped with the region’s famous cherry preserves.

Gallinera La Font chuleton de ternera steak_7712.JPG

Gallinera tarta de queso cherry preserve g_7721.JPG

 

Advertisements

Cherry blossom viewing in Spain

Te traeré de las montañas flores alegres, copihues,
avellanas oscuras, y cestas silvestres de besos.
Quiero hacer contigo
lo que la primavera hace con los cerezos.

I will bring you happy flowers from the mountains, bluebells,
dark hazels, and rustic baskets of kisses.
I want to do with you
what spring does with the cherry trees.

– Pablo Neruda

Not far from Villalonga, just a few kilometers up and over the ridge overlooking the magnificent semi-circular mountain range that is aptly called the Cirque de la Safor, is the Vall de Gallinera. ‘Vall’ is pronounced ‘Vai’, and I just realized recently that I had been mispronouncing it lo these many months. 😉  The Vall de Gallinera, partly in Valencia and partly in Alicante, is famous for its luscious dark-red sweet cherries that ripen in May. And right about now is when the cherry trees are in bloom. Although the online news mentioned that the best time for cherry blossom viewing is the end of March, spring this year has come rather early, and even the cherry tree in our garden is beginning to bloom. As we are a few hundred meters higher than the Vall de Gallinera, perhaps, just perhaps, I thought the cherry blossoms might be at their peak. If the online news pages turn out to be right, we can always go again, having seen for ourselves at which stage of bloom the trees are in.

And so off we went last Sunday. And what a splendid show of cherries in bloom [els cerrers en flor (Valenciano), los cerezos en flor (Castellano)] awaited us, from Benisilli through to Alpatro and beyond. So, best to go now if you wish to see this spectacle at its peak. The blossoms last about fifteen days, depending on the weather and temperature, naturally. Some orchards even had their trees starting to leaf out. I’m so glad we did get to do hanami (blossom viewing). And, unlike Japan, there were no tourist buses or parties of slightly tipsy revellers picnicking under the trees. No traffic, no crowds. Just us and the dogs. A few cars passed us by, but none stopped to take in the spectacular blossoms and admire them. I have to admit I rather prefer it this way. And, unlike the purely ornamental Japanese cherry blossom, there will be gorgeous fruit to look forward to in a couple of months’ time.

Gallinera crossroad cherries in bloom mts no road sign.jpg

Gallinera massive cherry trunk fab in bloom_5692

Gallinera cherry trunk bloom fab_5694.JPG