Sowing with the moon

There are gardeners who faithfully sow according to the phases of the moon, firm in their belief that the tug of the moon’s gravity influences germination time. I have in the past tried to time my sowing of flower seeds as the moon heads towards fullness, but I have not kept a record of how much faster germination happened. This year however, I’ve actually noted when I sowed seeds and when they eventually germinated. The earliest to germinate was a green vegetable: mizuna (Brassica rapa var. Nipponica), also known as Japanese turnip greens (and sometimes as mustard greens). Sown on the 1st of July, they germinated on the 3rd, a mere 48 hours from sowing. I was truly amazed.

Mizuna early germination_6441

I was concerned that the higher temperatures at the end of June would deter germination. Another concern was the onset of summer heat for the next month — according to a local gardener, mid-July to mid-August is the period of greatest heat. I’d been away during what would have been the best time to sow seeds for summer crops, but now that I’ve sown the seeds, it would be interesting to see how they fare at the height of summer. Today the mizuna look like this, with their first true leaves — the serrated ones — up. I shall have to thin these out soon.

Mizuna first true leaves

The optimum soil temperature that triggers cabbage (and its relatives, such as mizuna) seeds to germinate at 99% certainty is 77ºF or 26ºC (from germination tables posted by Tom Clothier. On average at this temperature, cabbage seeds should germinate in 5 days. So, my result compares favourably. Could this be attributed to the power of the moon? Hmmm… I honestly don’t know, and I would need another sowing (if not more) of the same seeds when the moon is on the wane for comparison.

The runner beans, sown on the same day as the mizuna, took 5 days to germinate, and leaves opened out on the 6th day. Cucumber – a local variety with a pale green skin and a similar shape to snake gourd — took 3 days to germinate. This is the same number of days posted by Tom Clothier at 86ºF (30ºC), though I doubt it refers to the same variety of cucumber.

Tarragon and Thai basil germinated in 4 days, and the dill and salad burnet likewise. This herb gardening site  gives 10 – 14 days as standard for tarragon seed to germinate (no soil temperature given on this site; for basil, 5 – 10 days. If using a special propagation medium (and I did not), basil could germinate in 2 – 3 days, and tarragon in a week.

Okra germinated in 5 days for me, and the germination time given for it by the SF Gate (no soil temperature given) is within a week, so it has germinated well within the normal time expected.

I also sowed some flower seeds: cosmos sprouted in 4 days; and sunflowers in 5 days.

Whether the moon’s phase had an accelerating effect or not, the rapid germination of these seeds – some of which are quite old and have been in storage for the past 3 years – is nothing short of astounding. The air temperature at sowing time has been between 21ºC (69.8ºF) and 27ºC (80º F) during the day, and dipped by 3 – 5ºC during the night.

I’m too much of a skeptic to garden entirely by the moon, though it remains to be seen whether the seeds I sow from now on, i.e., during the moon’s waning or dark phase, will germinate as rapidly as those sown before.

For those who are curious about gardening by the moon: this site recommends planting annual flowers and vegetables that bear crops above ground during the moon’s waxing phase: that is, from the day of the new moon to the day of the full moon. Flowering bulbs, biennial and perennial flowers, and vegetables that bear crops below ground are best planted during the waning phase: from the day after the full moon to the day before the new moon.

A German gardening magazine, Mein Schöner Garten, and its sister publication, Mein Schönes Land, use a more detailed moon calendar published by the Anthroposophical Society in Switzerland. This society also advocates Rudolf Steiner’s biodynamic method of gardening. The society’s Mondkalendar (moon calendar) even goes into specific hours, not just days, for garden care of flowers, leaves, fruits, and roots. It also recommends when to trim hedges or to do weeding, so that the subsequent growth is slower or weaker, thus lightening these garden chores.

I leave you with the moon over our hamlet, the day before it was full.

One day to full moon2.JPG

 

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